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What do those Acronyms mean?
Updated 04/07/2020


Video Screen technology formats:

(Plasma) In the early days of flat-panel High Definition TVs, plasma, with its inky blacks and top-notch picture quality, was the prevalent flat-panel technology, especially among videophiles. Now, Plasma has been overtaken and supplanted by LCD/LED technology.

(LCD) Liquid Crystal Display, (LED) Light-Emitting Diode technology replaced Plasma screens even though picture quality was and is subpar to Plasma. LCDs with LED backlighting, became less expensive and more capable, and finally overtook plasma in popularity.

(QLED) or quantum dot LED TV is a LED screen technology that adds a quantum dot film to the LCD. Unlike OLED the quantum dots are transmissive rather than emissive and rely on an LED backlight. Seen primarily in Samsung TVs.

(OLED) An organic light-emitting diode is a light-emitting diode (LED) screen technology in which the emissive electroluminescent layer is a film of organic compound that emits light in response to an electric current. OLED began and is still more expensive than LCD/LEDs, but OLED now produces picture quality generally as good or better than Plasma, mostly seen in high-end TVs and smartphones.

(AMOLED) active-matrix organic light-emitting diode, screen technology as seen on the brightest high-end smart phones and tablets, a step forward from OLED.

The next advance in LED displays will be called Mini-LED and Micro-LED.

    Mini-LEDs will likely be used in normal-sized screens such as PC and tablet screens and regular sized TVs (up to 65" or even 75").

    Micro-LEDs are modular in nature and will probably be used primarily in extra large screens such as
Sony's Crystal LED and Samsung's The Wall, which use millions of LEDs, one for each pixel. Micro-LEDs are currently much more expensive than other LED technologies, including Mini-LEDs.



Image resolution formats define how many pixels (individual picture elements) are present on a video screen.

(HD) High Definition 720p image resolution (1,280 x 720 or 921,600 pixels), sometimes (1366 x 768 pixels)

(FHD) Full High Definition 1080p image resolution (1920 x 1080 or 2,073,600 pixels)

(UHD) Ultra High Definition 4K image resolution (3840 x 2160 or 8,294,400 pixels)

8K or sometimes (8K UHD) image resolution (7,680 x 4,320 or 33,177,600 pixels) 8K TVs are starting to hit the market, but it's going to be a while (years) before this resolution is common or these displays are reasonably affordable.

    "Resolution is one of the most common specifications used to sell TVs, partly because "4K" and "8K" sound really high-tech and impressive. However, resolution is not the most important ingredient in picture quality. Just because a TV has higher resolution than another, doesn't always mean it's looks better. It might, but not always, and for reasons that have little to do with resolution. A TV with better high dynamic range (HDR) performance, a better overall contrast ratio or better color will look better than one that just has more pixels." (CNET)

What is HDR?

High-dynamic range (HDR) TV, when showing HDR content, has a wider dynamic range (contrast ratio), along with more steps in brightness (for smother transitions and more detail in bright and shadowy areas). Also, usually, HDR is paired with Wide Color Gamut (WCG), which offers a greater range and depth of color.

However, to take advantage of HDR's benefits you must be viewing special HDR content.

Finally, HDR for TV is not the same as HDR for photography

For a more detailed explanation of HDR for television
see this CNET article.




(VGA) Video Graphics Array with analog signal, does not carry audio


(DVI) Digital Visual Interface signal, normally same as HDMI, but without audio. Mostly on PCs but now being supplanted by HDMI


(HDMI) High Definition Multimedia Interface with digital signal, can also carry audio, seen on both PCs and TVs. Version 2.0 added support for 4K video and Version 2.1 added support for 8K video. All connectors and cables must be rated the same for higher resolutions.


(DisplayPort) Primarily a computer connection format for 4K 3840 x 2160-pixel resolution at 60fps, can also carry audio. Displayport 2.0 promises 8K video support by late 2020.


There is also a (MiniDP) or mDP Mini DisplayPort, which is a miniaturized version of the DisplayPort audio-visual digital interface, used mostly as a computer connection format (very little on televisions). Note: MiniDP ports on high-end PCs have now been supplanted by USB-C and/or Thunderbolt ports.



USB ports and versions:
connection used to connect Computers (PCs) to:
  • Printers
  • Scanners
  • Mice
  • Joysticks
  • Flight yokes
  • Digital cameras
  • Webcams
  • Modems
  • Speakers
  • Telephones
  • Video phones
  • Storage devices
  • Medical devices
  • Network connections

USB versions Note: Later version features sometimes overlap

USB 1.1 created in 1998 can transfer data at up to 12Mbps (Megabits per second).

USB 2.0 created in 2000 can transfer data at up to 480 Mbps.

USB 3.0 created in 2008 can transfer data at up to 5 Gbps (Gigabits per second). Note: Now also called USB version 3.1 Gen 1 or 3.2 Gen 1 or simply SuperSpeed USB.

USB 3.1 created in 2015 can transfer data at up to 10Gbps. Note: Now also called USB 3.1 Gen 2 or USB 3.2 Gen 2 and SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps.

USB 3.2 created in 2016 can transfer data at up to 20 Gbps. Note: Now also called USB version 3.2 Gen 2X2 or SuperSpeed USB 20Gbps

Note: In order to achieve the highest rated speeds and data rates all connected devices must be of the same version.

USB Version 3.0, 3.1, and 3.2 are sometimes marked with blue tabs inside the female and male ports and plugs or with SS (for Super Speed USB)

If the current version labeling scheme continues it is possible the upcoming USB version 4.0 may be just as jumbled and confusing.

USB Types and connectors


USB type A and B connectors
NOT reversible or interchangeable except through the use of dongles or adaptors.

USB type C


USB-C, created in 2016, is roughly one third the size of the common USB-A port and connector. It has a 24-pin reversible plug and its small size makes its ports ideal for use on the new thin PC's, tablets and Smartphones.

USB-C also supports power delivery (up to 100watts) and Video as well as data transfer for connections of either USB Version 3.1 Gen 1 at 5 Gbps and USB Version 3.1 Gen 2 at 10 Gbps or sometimes USB Version 3.2 at up to 20 Gbps.
Note: To achieve these rated speeds all connectors and cables used must rated the same version.

USB-C is backwards compatible with earlier USB versions and can be interconnected with other types of USB cables and ports with commonly available dongles and docking stations.
Throughput speeds will always be that of the lowest version devices connected.

Thunderbolt


The earliest version of Thunderbolt, created in 2011, used miniDisplayPort connectors and could transfer data at up to 10 Gbps when Apple was the primary user. Thunderbolt version 2 from 2013 could transfer data at 20 Gbps. Now the latest Thunderbolt 3 version (late 2015, early 2016) uses the USB Type C connector and port to achieve connection speeds of up to 40 Gbps (Gigabits per second, power delivery up to 100 watts and multiple 4K video connections).
Thunderbolt is a proprietary Intel protocol and has been reserved for devices which use Intel processors. Full support for PCs with AMD processors is in the works and upcoming.

Thunderbolt connectors and ports are marked with a lightning bolt and are commonly found on high-end laptop PC's from manufacturers such as Apple, Dell, and Hewlett Packard (HP).

Note: Even though Thunderbolt is backward compatible with USB-C right now any USB Type-C device or cable plugged into a Thunderbolt 3 port won't support Thunderbolt full features and speed. Also Thunderbolt 3 peripherals plugged into a regular USB Type-C port won't support Thunderbolt features either.

However the upcoming USB version 4 protocol is slated to support Thunderbolt 3 devices and capabilities, if not full speed.


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